JIU Virtual Research Workshop

Jones International University is proud to announce its first annual Virtual Research Workshop. The Research Workshop is sponsored by the Society of Scholars and facilitated through the Office of Faculty Development. The JIU society of Scholars was established in 2012 with the mission of promoting scholarly activities that support our graduate culture and foster the production of peer reviewed publications and presentations. The targeted participants for this Research Workshop are JIU Doctoral Students and JIU Faculty members.

Below is a collection of some of the presentations from our faculty members. We thank them for sharing their wisdom and expertise. These presentations will also be posted in the Teaching and Learning Commons TLC810 and TLC300 courses. Discussion threads will be set up for each presentation and we encourage all faculty and doctoral students to participate.

JIU Virtual Research Workshop Presentations

Best Research Paper Seal The JIU Society of Scholars and Office of Faculty Development are proud to announce the Best Research Paper submission to our double blind peer reviewed Call for Papers. Dorothy Della Noce is our award winner with her paper titled Questions that Get Answered. Dorothy has been a faculty member at JIU for several years and works in the School of Business. Congratulations to Dr. Della Noce as the 2013 Best Paper Award Winner!

Questions that Get Answered

By Dr. Dorothy J. Della Noce

On online asynchronous discussion boards, instructor questions are considered a driving force in student engagement and learning. Yet, students can and do choose not to answer questions from instructors. This presentation provides an overview of a qualitative study in which instructor-student interaction on an asynchronous discussion board was analyzed in order to determine which instructor’s questions students were more likely to answer and why. The results show that students were more likely to answer those instructor questions that were authentic and exhibited uptake of students’ comments. Moreover, the students’ orientation to those features suggests that students actively choose to engage in – and construct – coherent instructional interactions that characterize conversation rather than recitation.

Professionalism & Collegiality in Getting A Dissertation Chair & Committee

By Emma Cornell

In this workshop, students will learn essential skills for success in graduate school. At this higher level of education, professional standards in communication and work ethics apply to both students and faculty. The doctoral process upholds academic standards while encouraging collegiality by requiring a faculty chair and committee to supervise the research and writing of the dissertation. We will review the process for getting a dissertation chair and committee, and the important role of professionalism and collegiality in academic success.

English for Speakers of Other Languages: The Need for Continued Research

By Dr. Madge Becker

This presentation will address three areas directly impacting Jones International University's faculty in the area of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Language programs. Recently, the University was approved to offer a MED k-12 in CLD. This is a new focus for MA classes now offering state endorsements in second language acquisition. A historical overview of second language students will explore how immigration has changed the face of K-12 education requiring teachers to have second language acquisition skills as part of their praxis. The final discussion will involve how the second language learner can be supported in online education.

The objective is to provide an overview of second language acquisition, and the supports needed to adequately address success for the second language learner in an online environment. Challenges and strategies will be presented.

What a Student Should Expect From a Dissertation Chair

By Michael H. McGivern, PhD

In the doctoral process, there are times when the mentee does not understand the role of the Dissertation Chair. Sometimes the dissertation chair may not understand their role with respect to JIU’s expectations. The focus of this presentation will be about what the dissertation mentor's roles are to assist the student on a doctoral journey.

Retention

By Richard J. Thomas

Present examples of "Best Practices" which may serve to increase retention (e.g. Faculty Checklist).

Present recent examples of JIU's attempt to increase retention (e.g. JIU101 mandatory participation).

Present ideas which, upon implementation, may serve to aid efforts to increase retention (e.g. Utilize technology in order to notify Faculty following a student's reading of a direct Forum post).

Grants and Scholarships for Online Learners

By Saundra Braxton, Jacqueline Chestnut and Elizabeth Asfaw

The workshop will provide financial resources for online adult learners. The financial resources will range from government to non-profit organizations. The presentation will list current websites and links for funding opportunities.

Research Roundtable Presentation: Qualitative Research

By Dr. Dorothy J. Della Noce

This portion of the Roundtable will focus on what constitutes “good” qualitative research. Using Sarah Tracy’s (2010; 2013) framework, eight criteria of quality will be examined, including: worthy topic, rich rigor, sincerity, credibility, resonance, significant contribution, ethical, and meaningful coherence.

Mixed Method Research

By Dr. Kathleen M. Hargiss

On online asynchronous discussion boards, instructor questions are considered a driving force in student engagement and learning. Yet, students can and do choose not to answer questions from instructors. This presentation provides an overview of a qualitative study in which instructor-student interaction on an asynchronous discussion board was analyzed in order to determine which instructor’s questions students were more likely to answer and why. The results show that students were more likely to answer those instructor questions that were authentic and exhibited uptake of students’ comments. Moreover, the students’ orientation to those features suggests that students actively choose to engage in – and construct – coherent instructional interactions that characterize conversation rather than recitation.

Size of Asynchronous Discussion Forum and Student Perception of Learning: A Case Study

By Miro Smriga

This case study explored a possible relationship between learner ratings of online courses conducted via the Jones International University (JIU) asynchronous Forum and the class interaction reported by students on one side, and the number of Forum participants on the other. The study was based on monthly ratings of courses conducted by a single instructor during period of thirty-three successive months. No relationship between students’ assessment of learning (rating of a course) and the size of asynchronous Forum (number of students) was found. Comparably, no substantial time-dependent variation in course ratings was found. Presented results indicated that an instructor’s interaction with students, and appropriate management of a course were more important in students rating of learning and knowledge construction, than the size of asynchronous Forums.

APA Workshop

By Dr. Sally Everts

In this APA Workshop, learners will be given an overview of APA formatting and how to fix common errors seen in the JIU Graduate Programs. References will be made to the JIU APA Handbook and Style Guide. All students and faculty will benefit from viewing this Workshop.